One Scientist’s Attempt to Create a New Science Communication Platform

As someone who writes about science communication, I’m always interested in experiments designed to help people share information about research and research findings. Sometimes they are formal studies designed by science communication scholars, and sometimes they’re efforts by scientists, reporters or professional communicators to try something new and see how it works.

I work at NC State University, and in late 2015 met a postdoctoral researcher at NC State named Kamy Singer. His research focused on plant and microbial biology, but he was also the creator of a web platform called SPapers that aims to help researchers share their work more effectively. Continue reading “One Scientist’s Attempt to Create a New Science Communication Platform”

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News Brief: NSF Unveils Plan for Public Access to NSF-Funded Research

News Brief

The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a plan March 18 that would require researchers to make publications pertaining to NSF-funded research freely and publicly available within 12 months of their initial publication. The requirement will apply to all projects whose proposals are submitted after the agency issues its Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide in January 2016. Continue reading “News Brief: NSF Unveils Plan for Public Access to NSF-Funded Research”

A Journal to Advance Citizen Science: an Interview with Caren Cooper

Detail of a photo of the Cascade Butterfly Project in Mt. Rainier National Park. Photo credit: Kevin Bacher. Click for more information.
Crop of a photo of the Cascade Butterfly Project, Mt. Rainier National Park. Photo credit: Kevin Bacher. Click for details.

Science communication and citizen science have a lot in common – namely, the desire to engage with people both inside and outside of the traditional science community. But where science communication is often seeking only to educate or to get folks interested in science, citizen science is trying to get people actively involved in the scientific process. Continue reading “A Journal to Advance Citizen Science: an Interview with Caren Cooper”

Science Blogging and Citations

Photo credit: North Carolina State University
Photo credit: North Carolina State University

Paige Brown Jarreau, author of the SciLogs blog From The Lab Bench, recently wrote a lengthy post on the science of science blogging. The post included a lengthy list of related journal articles, and one of them caught my eye: “Do blog citations correlate with a higher number of future citations?” With Paige’s blessing, I decided to unpack that particular paper a bit. Continue reading “Science Blogging and Citations”

Scicomm Accessibility: Accessing Scicomm Journals

Photo credit: Nevit Dilmen
Photo credit: Nevit Dilmen, via Wikimedia Commons

Science communication researchers aren’t the only people interested in science communication research. Reporters, bloggers and researchers from various fields interested in sharing their work (among others) are interested in learning what “scicomm” can tell us about conveying scientific information to various audiences. But reaching the relevant research findings can be difficult. Continue reading “Scicomm Accessibility: Accessing Scicomm Journals”

Citation Rates Highlight Uphill Battle for Women in Research Careers

Photo by George Joch, courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.
Photo by George Joch, courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.

One of the most important and institutionalized forms of science communication is the peer-reviewed journal article. These articles are essential to disseminating information among researchers in specific fields of study, and the extent to which those journal articles are cited by researchers in later articles is of enormous professional importance to researchers – particularly researchers who work in academic settings. But it appears that many researchers face an uphill battle when it comes to getting citations and related professional benefits. Specifically, researchers who are women. Continue reading “Citation Rates Highlight Uphill Battle for Women in Research Careers”