News Brief: New Guidance on Using Embargoes Effectively

Embargoes can be a useful tool for giving reporters timely notice of forthcoming research findings. But when not handled properly, the embargo process can also be a major source of frustration for both reporters and public information officers (PIOs). A new (and admirably concise) guide outlines ten rules that can help ensure that embargoes are useful, rather than obstructive. Continue reading “News Brief: New Guidance on Using Embargoes Effectively”

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Defining a Reporter: EurekAlert! and the Question of Access

Who is a science reporter (and who isn’t)? (Photo: Beth Rankin)

Science reporters and bloggers are always looking for ways to stay abreast of new and forthcoming findings from the research community. One way to do that is to register with an online science news service called EurekAlert!, which is run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). But the changing face of science news is creating some interesting problems for the service – and giving them a chance to take the lead on an important question: who gets access to science news? [Note: this post has been updated, see below.] Continue reading “Defining a Reporter: EurekAlert! and the Question of Access”

Embargoes and Retractions: an Interview with Ivan Oransky, Part Two

Photo credit: nh313066/stock.xchng

In the second part of my interview with Ivan Oransky, we talk about what led to his founding of Embargo Watch and co-founding of Retraction Watch – as well as the Ingelfinger Rule, what he looks for in a medical reporter and what you can learn from grad students. The first part of the interview can be found here. Continue reading “Embargoes and Retractions: an Interview with Ivan Oransky, Part Two”

Embargoes as Self-Defense, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Live with Embargoes

Image from “Dr. Strangelove,” Columbia Pictures Corporation

For a long time, I avoided promoting embargoed research findings as much as possible. Now I don’t. Now I use embargoes. I still don’t like them, mind you, but I learned that I have to use them – if only in self-defense. Continue reading “Embargoes as Self-Defense, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Live with Embargoes”

Why I Think Ditching Embargoes Was a Good Move by eLife

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A new, open-access journal called eLife released its “media policy” earlier this week – including a promise to not issue embargoed news releases and language encouraging researchers to make their accepted manuscripts available to the public in advance of publication. I think this is a good move. Continue reading “Why I Think Ditching Embargoes Was a Good Move by eLife”